“Smoking and mental health, what’s the connection?”

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This July 15, 2014 article on TheGuardian website in the United Kingdom talks about the high number of people with mental illnesses who smoke and looks at not only research, but offers some insight into some things that could be considered to be “cultural views” on smoking within the mental health community that have been historically seen in both the professionals and the people who are diagnosed with a mental illness.  The article also seems to say that it is harder for someone with a mental illness to quit smoking than it is for someone without a mental illness to carry out the same thing.  While researchers don’t know why this is, there is definitely a growing trend towards trying to understand this strong connection between mental illness and tobacco addiction.

Smoke

Smoke (Photo credit: paulbence)

“Giving Up Smoking: The New Way to Get ‘Rich’ Quick?”

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This undated article on the Money.co.uk website offers some insight into the financial benefits of quitting smoking.

I am a former smoker myself, and when I quit, I was spending about $150 per month on smokes and was averaging about 4 or 5 cartons per month around the year 2009.  I found at that time that cost of items to help me quit was far less than what I was paying per month for smokes.  my insurance covered Chantix which worked well for me, so I think I paid $10 or less for my supply of Chantix.  I bought lots of hard candy which cost me about $10, but was very helpful when I would get cravings or feel like I needed to be doing something with my hands or mouth to keep them occupied.  The first thing I noticed after I quit was that I was less stressed due to financial issues, because I had an extra $150 to work with each month.  So even though quitting smoking was challenging, the financial reward was priceless.

A 21 mg dose Nicoderm CQ patch applied to the ...

A 21 mg dose Nicoderm CQ patch applied to the left arm. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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“New study shows saliva test could predict which teen boys get depression”

On the Threshold of Eternity

On the Threshold of Eternity (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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This February 19, 2014 The Mercury Lifestyle article talks about a new test that may be helpful in predicting whether there is a risk for a male teen to later be diagnosed with major depression.  The test has been tried in both men and women, but findings show that it is more exact in men then it is in women.   The test looks at cortisol levels in the saliva which is used as a gauge to predict the risk of depression.  The test is being looked at in London, but is something that could be useful if it proves to be accurate in the long run.

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