“Mentally ill on hold without treatment: Norristown State Hospital lacks rooms for defendants deemed incompetent for trial”

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This July 15, 2016 article by Kaitlyn Foti found on the Mainline Media News website talks about the extremely long waiting list for beds at Torrance State Hospital and Norristown State Hospital Forensic Units.  The article talks about the impact not only to the person who is on the waiting list, but also their family, the flow of inmates through jails, and the financial impact faced by having to hold someone in jail who is on a waiting list for treatment.

“Forteniters Club in Norristown celebrates 40 years of fellowship”

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This December 28, 2014 The Times Herald article talks about a group that meets every couple of weeks and consists of people who have been in treatment for mental illness.  the group focuses on getting together to have fun, socialize and feel a sense of belonging to a community that is something people with mental illnesses tend to struggle with.  The atmosphere is one of acceptance.

”UPDATE: ‘Bug Oven’ Caused Friday Night Fire at State Hospital”

Location of Norristown in Montgomery County

Image via Wikipedia

Article Link

This article dated October 1, 2011 indicates that a device used to combat bed bug infestation commonly called a ‘bug oven’ was faulty and caused a fire at Norristown State Hospital.  The article was found on the Norristown Patch website and is a followup to an article dated September 30, 2011 on the same site which was the first piece about the fire and can be found here.

“Petrarca successfully fights closing of forensic psychiatric unit at Torrance State Hospital”

http://www.pahouse.com/PR/055062811.asp

This one was news to me, I wasn’t aware of the possibility that the forensic unit at Torrance was being considered for closure.   but the above link is to a press release from State Rep Joe Petrarca indicating that he had stopped the closure

 

 

“Fate of Norristown State Hospital remains up for debate”

  Interesting article, not that it has to do directly with Mental Health, but it offers some interesting insight into the potential future of Norristown State Hospital.  This article was found in the April 30, 2009 issue of Philly.com local news website and can be found in it’s original format at …http://www.philly.com/philly/news/local/20090430_Fate_of_Norristown_State_Hospital_remains_up_for_debate.html

Fate of Norristown State Hospital remains up for debate

Across from a neighborhood of bungalows and rowhouses along the Norristown-West Norriton border, Norristown State Hospital stretches for 225 rolling, tree-lined acres, awaiting its third life.

But what might be in store for the 30-building site, which includes a dwindling mental institution, is an ongoing debate.

“Frankly, it’s a large parcel of land that’s completely underutilized and off the tax rolls,” State Rep. Matthew Bradford (D., Montgomery) said. “It’s time to have an honest discussion of what we do going forward.”

The complex, which opened with 392 patients and grew to hold thousands, has the lowest population in its 192-year history, and is scheduled to shrink further. Some of the buildings have been rented to social-service providers and government agencies, while others are vacant and in disrepair.

Two state agencies, the Department of General Services and the Department of Public Welfare, oversee the hospital, but neither has a plan for its future, said Stacey Witalec, a state spokeswoman.

In March, Norristown residents protested and turned back a state-approved bid to bring in its 32d tenant: Vision Quest, an agency that houses at-risk youths.

“When places are looking for a place to house dangerous pedophiles or children waiting to enter into the social-service system, they house them in Norristown,” said Gina Bottone, one of the protestors.

Government outposts and agencies to aid the troubled or drug-addicted rent nearly half the buildings still standing at Norristown State Hospital, while patients occupy just four.

Ten of the buildings, scheduled for demolition, are roped off and vacant. Their boarded-up windows face potholed roads. Most are dilapidated, red-brick Victorian buildings, originally patient lodgings.

Today, their craggy, sagging entranceways and “danger” signs dispel any perception of warmth. Three will be torn down this year, more when the money is budgeted, said Gerald P. Kent, chief executive officer of the hospital.

“We’re trying to get smaller,” he said.

Neighbors, and their political allies, say the decay has made the sprawling site an eyesore.

“I don’t think that over several decades we’ve been very good stewards of the property,” Bradford said.

He and Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery) say they want a direction for Norristown State Hospital beyond the ad-hoc, one-year leases to agencies neighbors regard as a perennial problem.

Officially, nothing has happened.

“We’d like to move toward a more definitive plan,” Vereb said. “What that plan is, I just don’t know. I don’t know anybody that does know.”

Meanwhile, the mental hospital’s population, 380 now, will eventually recede nearly to a patient an acre. That was unthinkable when 4,700 patients overfilled the place in 1954, before psychiatric drugs became widely available and more emphasis was placed on allowing the mentally ill to avoid long-term commitments.

Norristown hoped the dwindling was a one-way street. Thirty years ago, the hospital was down to 1,200 patients, and then-City Manager John Plonski railed about “another influx of criminals” when a new ward for criminally insane juveniles was proposed.

Total closure seems unlikely. For one, the 136-patient forensic unit for criminally committed patients is often near capacity.

“The forensic unit is going to be here for God knows how long,” said Aidan Altenor, the hospital’s former head, who now oversees it and other state hospitals from Harrisburg.

There is, however, a precedent for turning obsolete parts of Norristown State Hospital into an asset for the neighborhoods around it: Neighboring Norristown Farm Park, an immense public park on land where patients once raised crops and livestock.

Observers talk about similar ideas coming out of the hospital’s limbo.

“It would be a beautiful addition if we could get it to developable land,” said Bill Caldwell, who chairs the Norristown Council’s planning and economic development committee. “In a town of 3.5 square miles that was built out probably 100 years ago, you know, that’s a tough thing to find.”

“Vision Quest details architectural plans Building at state hospital would become a youth crisis center”

This article found in the Monday, January 12, 2009 issue of the Norristown Times-Herald and can be viewed below or at the following address http://www.timesherald.com/articles/2009/01/12/news/doc496aca3cee3ac542528279.prt  

 

Vision Quest details architectural plans

Building at state hospital would become a youth crisis center

 

Monday, January 12, 2009 3:14 AM EST

 

By CARL ROTENBERG
Times Herald Staff

NORRISTOWN — The latest use variance request from Vision Quest of Downingtown to use Building 12 at Norristown State Hospital for a youth crisis diagnostic service for 12- to 18-year-olds, details how rooms in the three-story brick building would be used.

The architectural plans by David Black Associates in Chambersburg show a cafeteria, commercial kitchen, laundry facility and storage spaces in the 27,992-square-foot basement.

The first floor includes 14 bedrooms, four solariums, two dayrooms, two classrooms and two computer labs. The largest bedrooms measure 20 by 26 feet and are divided into four smaller areas by room dividers.

The second floor includes 12 bedrooms, four solariums, six administration offices, two dayrooms, two classrooms and one computer lab.

A packet of about 20 color photos submitted with the use variance application details the outside of the red-brick “U”-shaped building.

A 12-foot high cyclone fence, with a four-foot inward, inclined extension on top, closes off the grassy interior courtyard from the rest of the Norristown State Hospital campus.

The “former 24-hour psychiatric facility” would be equipped with “delayed egress locks” at all outside doors to prevent unauthorized entry and exit, the zoning application said. Any opening of the doors would start an “audible signal” (alarm).

Only a loss of electric power, a fire or an electric signal from each dayroom can disable the lock system, the application said.

Vision Quest and the state Department of General Services, which operates state facilities for the state Department of Public Welfare, have jointly applied for the use variance.

The use variance argued the “use is a permitted use pursuant to Section 320-81A(7) of the Norristown zoning ordinance, to the extent relief is deemed to be required.”

“Applicant seeks requested relief and any and all other relief as may be necessary to operate facility,” the application said, for an “institution for the short-term care of minor children in a custodial healthcare facility.”

The state hospital property, located at Sterigere and Stanbridge streets, has limited uses in several buildings for psychiatric care, the criminally insane and homeless services. Many buildings with broken windows and a dilapidated appearance on the grounds are posted with “Danger — No Entrance” signs.

The Norristown Zoning Hearing Board will hold a hearing on Vision Quest’s request for a use variance at 7 p.m., Jan. 27, at the municipal hall.

The Norristown State Hospital Board of Trustees issued a press release Thursday that said it understands and respects the community’s concerns regarding Vision Quest’s zoning application.

The board members said their responsibility is to advise, assist and make recommendations to the CEO of the hospital on management and operations questions.

They also expressed commitment to quality care for those who live at Norristown State Hospital.

State Rep. Mike Vereb, R- Dist. 150, and State Rep. Matthew Bradford, D-Dist. 70, have publicly opposed the Vision Quest proposal along with a majority of Norristown council.

Residents living in the neighborhood around the hospital have also expressed strong opposition.

“It’s bad news for Norristown,” said Norristown resident Gina Bottone in December. “It’s a black mark on the better reputation that Norristown is trying to build for itself. I don’t think Norristown should have to babysit Philadelphia’s problem children.”

In a Nov. 26, 2008 letter to Norristown Zoning Officer Jayne Musonye, the director of the Bureau of Real Estate for the state General Services department had asserted the department’s right to use the building.

“The intended use is clearly a permitted use and also a necessary function that is critical to the delivery of services required by the (state Department of Public Welfare) DPW,” wrote Joanne Phillips, the real estate director. “The Department of General Services is advising Vision Quest that they have fully complied with their lease agreement with the Commonwealth and we are authorizing Vision Quest to initiate occupancy of Building 12 at Norristown State Hospital.”

That letter prompted Norristown officials to get a state court order late last year, which forced Vision Quest to apply for a use variance.

Carl Rotenberg can be reached at crotenberg@timesherald.com or 610-272-2500, ext. 350.

“Hearing request postponed”

This article found in the Tuesday, December 16, 2008edition of The Times-Herald in Norristown offers an update as to where things are at with Vision Quest’s proposal to utilize building 12 on Norristown State Hospital grounds to house 100+ male teens who are in need of emergency crisis services.  this particular article seems to indicate that Vision Quest has a green light to move in, but I feel like there is more to the story then what is in the article. 

This article can be found at the following address … http://www.timesherald.com/articles/2008/12/16/news/doc494729b1eeb78123847051.txt 

Hearing request postponed

 

Tuesday, December 16, 2008 1:18 AM EST

By CARL ROTENBERG
Times Herald Staff

NORRISTOWN — An emergency court hearing on Norristown’s request for an injunction against a proposal for youth housing and treatment in Building 12 at Norristown State Hospital was postponed Monday afternoon in Harrisburg.

The postponement of the hearing before a Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania judge happened after Norristown officials, Norristown Solicitor Todd Eisenberg and representatives of Vision Quest of Downingtown, Chester County, and Tucson, Ariz., and the state Department of General Services (DGS) apparently agreed Vision Quest would apply for a use variance and a public hearing before the Norristown Zoning Hearing Board, said Municipal Administrator David Forrest.

A proposal to use Building 12 on the hospital grounds for 12-to-18-year-old youth needing “emergency or crisis diagnostic services” has run into major opposition from West End neighbors, municipal officials and two state representatives.

In a Nov. 26 letter to Norristown Zoning Officer Jayne Musonye, the director of the Bureau of Real Estate for the state General Services department asserted the department’s right to use the building.

“The intended use is clearly a permitted use and also a necessary function that is critical to the delivery of services required by the (state Department of Public Welfare) DPW,” said Joanne Phillips, the real estate director. “The Department of General Services is advising Vision Quest that they have fully complied with their lease agreement with the Commonwealth and we are authorizing Vision Quest to initiate occupancy of Building 12 at Norristown State Hospital.”

That state letter prompted Norristown to seek the injunction.

A 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, meeting at Hancock Fire Co., 820 W. Airy St., Norristown with Ward 1 and Ward 2 residents will include a discussion of the Vision Quest proposal.

Council President Mila Hayes and Councilman William Caldwell, the representatives of the two wards, will moderate the discussion.  

Last week state Rep. Mike Vereb, R-150th Dist., said his opposition to the proposal started with “the lack of notification to the community.”

Carl Rotenberg can be reached at crotenberg@timesherald.com or 610-272-2500, ext. 350.

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