“Murder reflects plight of ex-Mayview patients”

1106 Mayview Hospital_128

1106 Mayview Hospital_128 (Photo credit: nooccar)

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This November 23, 2013 article on the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette website sheds some light on what has happened to some of the former patients from Mayview State Hospital since it closed in 2008

“State to be paid $505,505 for Mayview”

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10154/1062611-57.stm

In the June 3, 2010 edition of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette is an article indicating that the property and building formerly the location of Mayview State Hospital is being purchased for $505,505.

While the amount is disappointing, there has been legislation signed that will indicates that the amount left after the State recovers it’s costs for maintaining the property since the closure, that the remaining amount will be split 50/50 betwenn the Mental Health and Mental Retardation budgets for the ares that were serviced by Mayview. 

The article describes things in more detail, but that should give you an idea of what is happening.

I’m pleased about where the proceeds will be going, but feel like the devaluing due to asbestos in the buildings, in many ways short changed the programs that would be benefiting from the money.  Still though I don’t feel it is a complete loss, things could have gone much differently then they did and something is generally better then nothing when it comes to money in my mind.

“Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unknown”

 

Those curious about the eventual fate of the Mayview State Hospital property will
have to wait another month.
The state task force studying the issue cancelled the meeting it had scheduled for
tonight, and is withholding its draft report to await more information.
“We are expecting the final appraisal and land survey in
June,” State Sen. John Pippy, R-Moon, said Monday.
“Originally we didn’t know when that was going to come
back. Since we’re going to have it, it seemed wise to wait
for it.”
The state, as part of its program to decentralize mental health
care, closed the hospital at the end of the year. Mr. Pippy is
co-chair of the task force, which is exploring the best use of the 335-acre site on
Chartiers Creek in South Fayette.
The process has not been free of controversy. Advocates have staged rallies at task
force meetings, calling for a sale at the highest possible price with the proceeds
going toward mental health care.
Others have been sounding a cautionary note, pointing out that slopes and wetlands
limit the buildable space to about 80 acres, noting that access on Mayview Road
would limit development for major business or commercial use and saying that the
roughly 30 buildings will have serious asbestos issues in demolition or reuse.
South Fayette commissioners recently changed the property’s zoning to a newly
created designation for recreational use, which would include use as a public park,
low-density residential or agriculatural use or such commercial recreation use as a
golf course.
The township is interested in acquiring the upper part of the property — west of
Mayview Road, up a steep slope — and adding it to the adjacent Fairview Park.
Some of the hospital buildings are more than a century old, and many are in poor
condition, ill-suited for reuse. Those dating from the middle of the 20th Century are
laden with asbestos, as are most buildings from the era. It will have to be safely
removed whether they are renovated or demolished.
Mr. Pippy said the task force essentially agrees with the goals of the mental health
advocates.
Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unknown
State to release report next month
Thursday, May 07, 2009
By Brian David, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
LOCAL / NEIGHBORHOODS / SOUTH
Inside Neighborhoods:
City
East
West
North
South
Washington
Westmoreland
5/10/2009 Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unk…
post-gazette.net/pg/…/968062-55.stm 1/2
advocates.
“We’ve been working with them closely over the last couple of months,” he said.
“We want to make sure that as much money comes from this as possible, and that it
goes to mental health care.”
But it’s not likely to be tens of millions, as advocates would like. “I don’t think
people have taken fully into account the cost of demolition,” Mr. Pippy said.
The task force commissioned the appraisal in March; the contract called for an
assessment of the land’s value at its highest possible use, regardless of zoning.
Having it should lend some clarity to the draft report, which Mr. Pippy described
as “essentially an attempt to summarize most of the notes we’ve taken at the various
hearings” held about the land’s use.
The task force announced several weeks ago that it would post the report on its
Web site about a week prior to tonight’s meeting. But when it cancelled the
meeting, it also cancelled plans to post the report.
“There won’t be anything in there that’s new,” Mr. Pippy said. “It’s all the stuff
people have been hearing talk about. But it seemed prudent to wait for the
appraisal.”

 

This article first seen in the May 7, 2009 issue of the Pittsburgh post-gazette offers an update as to where things are with regards to the issues surrounding the re-use of the former Mayview state Hospital property.  The article can be found in it’s original format at … http://www.post-gazette.net/pg/09127/968062-55.stm

Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unknown

State to release report next month

Those curious about the eventual fate of the Mayview State Hospital property will have to wait another month.

The state task force studying the issue cancelled the meeting it had scheduled for tonight, and is withholding its draft report to await more information.

“We are expecting the final appraisal and land survey in June,” State Sen. John Pippy, R-Moon, said Monday.

“Originally we didn’t know when that was going to come back. Since we’re going to have it, it seemed wise to wait for it.”

The state, as part of its program to decentralize mental health care, closed the hospital at the end of the year. Mr. Pippy is co-chair of the task force, which is exploring the best use of the 335-acre site on Chartiers Creek in South Fayette.

The process has not been free of controversy. Advocates have staged rallies at task force meetings, calling for a sale at the highest possible price with the proceeds going toward mental health care.

Others have been sounding a cautionary note, pointing out that slopes and wetlands limit the buildable space to about 80 acres, noting that access on Mayview Road would limit development for major business or commercial use and saying that the roughly 30 buildings will have serious asbestos issues in demolition or reuse.

South Fayette commissioners recently changed the property’s zoning to a newly created designation for recreational use, which would include use as a public park, low-density residential or agriculatural use or such commercial recreation use as a golf course.

The township is interested in acquiring the upper part of the property — west of Mayview Road, up a steep slope — and adding it to the adjacent Fairview Park.

Some of the hospital buildings are more than a century old, and many are in poor condition, ill-suited for reuse. Those dating from the middle of the 20th Century are laden with asbestos, as are most buildings from the era. It will have to be safely removed whether they are renovated or demolished.

Mr. Pippy said the task force essentially agrees with the goals of the mental health advocates.

Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unknown State to release report next month.  Advocates. “We’ve been working with them closely over the last couple of months,” he said.

“We want to make sure that as much money comes from this as possible, and that it goes to mental health care.”

But it’s not likely to be tens of millions, as advocates would like. “I don’t think people have taken fully into account the cost of demolition,” Mr. Pippy said.

The task force commissioned the appraisal in March; the contract called for an assessment of the land’s value at its highest possible use, regardless of zoning.

Having it should lend some clarity to the draft report, which Mr. Pippy described as “essentially an attempt to summarize most of the notes we’ve taken at the various hearings” held about the land’s use.

The task force announced several weeks ago that it would post the report on its Web site about a week prior to tonight’s meeting. But when it cancelled the meeting, it also cancelled plans to post the report.

“There won’t be anything in there that’s new,” Mr. Pippy said. “It’s all the stuff people have been hearing talk about. But it seemed prudent to wait for the appraisal.”

“Mayview Patients One Year Later”

  I found the following article that includes a link to an audio broadcast offering an update on the status of those still at Mayview and also gives a sort of window into what is happening with those who are living in the community.  It was originally posted on WDUQ’s blog on April 17, 2009, but it answered a few questions I had regarding wondering how folks that were discharged from Mayview were doing and if the community had the supports in place these folks needed before they were discharged.  You can read the writeup below or follow this link to check it out for yourself and listen to the audio broadcast fo the segment. http://wduqnews.blogspot.com/2009/04/mayview-patients-one-year-later.html 

Mayview Patients One Year Later

Mayview State Hospital closed nearly a year ago, and former residents are living in the community. At one time the facility housed more than one thousand patients, but by the time it closed, there were just 250. In 2007 two of those patients died of unnatural causes, but the general consensus is that the vast majority are doing well and getting the services they need. Most of those services are being provided by small nonprofit organizations. Patients, service providers and doctors all seem to have their own take on the way the new system is working. You can hear some of those thoughts by listening to a longer version of the story.

“South Fayette plans public hearing for Mayview property”

This article found in the March 17, 2009 issue of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette further discusses  the possible uses for the former Mayview State Hospital Grounds.  The article can be found in its original format at … http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09076/956220-100.stm

South Fayette plans public hearing for Mayview property
Tuesday, March 17, 2009

The South Fayette commissioners last night set an April 13 public hearing date for a proposed new recreational-use zoning district that was designed with the Mayview State Hospital property in mind.

Mayview closed at the end of 2008 and the state has launched a task force to determine the best use for the 330-acre property. An appraisal has been ordered to determine the value of the property and its most profitable potential use.

South Fayette officials have said that only about 90 of the property’s acres are useable because of wetlands, slopes and railroad tracks. It is also in a relatively remote location along Mayview Road fronting Chartiers Creek.

The property originally was zoned for residential use, but the commissioners in October rezoned it for use as a business park. They said at the time that they were designing a new zoning designation for it.

South Fayette manager Mike Hoy said the proposed district is modeled on recreational zones in other municipalities, allowing private, public or non-profit recreational uses, agriculture or extremely low-density housing.

He said officials had consulted with their counterparts in neighboring municipalities — especially Upper St. Clair, which lies on the other side of the creek — in drawing the district.

“We want to provide the best possibility for redevelopment in a manner that is in the best interests of not only South Fayette but others, too,” Mr. Hoy said. “What can we do here that can benefit everyone?”

Advocates for former Mayview patients have been lobbying to have the land sold for the highest amount possible with the money going to help care for the mentally ill.

Mr. Hoy said the zoning should add value, because the slopes and wetlands can be used for recreation.

“It really lends value to areas that are pretty much undevelopable in the first place,” he said.

Brian David can be reached at bdavid@post-gazette.com or at 412-722-0086.
First published on March 17, 2009 at 5:36 am

“Mayview property likely will be split”

This article was found in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review on Saturday, February 21, 2009 at the following location …. http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/s_612789.html

Mayview property likely will be split

By Bonnie Pfister
TRIBUNE-REVIEW

Saturday, February 21, 2009

 

The 300-acre campus of the former Mayview State Hospital likely will be split in two, with its tree-covered slopes preserved as green space, while the flatter area could be redeveloped into a residential “village” or business park.

South Fayette Township Manager Michael Hoy said Friday that removing 40 steeply sloped acres would likely make the grounds more attractive to developers. Proposals for the land that housed the psychiatric hospital are still in their infancy.

The property is zoned for either business or residential development.

Building a housing and treatment facility for people with mental-health issues also is a possibility, Hoy said.

Chris Goswick of the Allegheny County Department of Economic Development, and a member of the Mayview Land Reuse Task Force that met Thursday to discuss the future of the property, said the county can’t afford large-scale infrastructure work there. The land is accessible by a simple two-lane road only, and county resources already are tapped to cover upgrades to existing bridges and roads.

Mayview ceased to operate as a hospital in late December, although 11 patients are housed in what is now a long-term structured residence — the most secure type of housing-and-treatment facility available for people with mental illnesses. Those patients are expected to be moved to other accommodations by the end of June, said Rich Kuppelweiser, the facility’s chief operating officer.

On Thursday, about 60 activists with the Consumer Health Coalition urged task force co-Chairs Sen. John Pippy, R-Moon, and Nick Kotik, D-McKees Rocks, to find a way to bring proceeds of the land sale to the region for mental-health services. Sen. Jim Ferlo, D-Highland Park, introduced such a resolution Wednesday to the Legislature. Existing law requires proceeds of state land to go to a general fund.

Kotik offered his support, but made no promises.

“John and I will do all we can,” Kotik said. “But unless we can convince at least 26 senators and 102 legislators that this has merit, it’s not going to pass.”

Members of the task force will meet at least twice more before making final recommendations to the state, perhaps in May. The land sale is not expected for at least another year.

“Money for Mayview patients?”

This article found in the Pitsburgh Post-Gazette on Thursday, February 26, 2009 and can be found at … http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09057/951665-57.stm

The article discusses the ongoing debate over where the proceeds from the sale or lease of the land occupied by the now closed Mayview State Hospital.

Money for Mayview patients?
Coalition wants proceeds from sale of hospital to be used for mentally ill
Thursday, February 26, 2009

Sally Jo Snyder is about to reach the first of her three major goals regarding the closed Mayview State Hospital.

Next month, an appraiser will be chosen to analyze the value of the hospital’s 300-acre site on the South Fayette-Upper St. Clair border, both in light of the current zoning and the best use of the property.

The highest and best language means the appraiser will look at the type of development that would make the property the most valuable, and will include that in the analysis.

“Historically, properties like this have been sold for a song, then developed, and the community makes a killing,” Ms. Snyder said Tuesday.

This time around, she instead wants the appraisal to be followed by a sale at fair market value with proceeds going to a fund that will fill the void of Mayview by caring for the mentally ill.

“Let’s honor what the true intent of that land is,” she said.

Ms. Snyder, a United Methodist minister who heads the Consumer Health Coalition and has taken up the cause of former Mayview patients, has been pushing her agenda at meetings of a task force set up by the state to determine the eventual use of the Mayview property.

About 100 coalition members showed up at last Thursday’s task force meeting wearing black and gold T-shirts bearing a quote from the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: “The time is always right, to do the right thing.”

One problem for the coalition, though, is that the enemy is nebulous. The politicians involved — task force co-chairs state Sen. John Pippy, R-Moon, and State Rep. Nick Kotik, D-Robinson, as well as state Rep. Dan Frankel, D-Squirrel Hill, and state Sen. Jim Ferlo, D-Highland Park — have been supportive of the coalition’s goals, and legislation on the use of sale proceeds is in the works.

But precedent, bureaucracy and the state’s financial straits all pose challenges.

Ms. Snyder noted that an authority created by Haverford Township in suburban Philadelphia bought the 250-acre Haverford State Hospital site for $3.5 million in 2002, and in 2006 sold 39 acres to a housing developer for $17 million. None of the money went to benefit the mentally ill.

Officials in South Fayette have said that only about 90 acres of the Mayview property are usable; the rest are wetlands, steeply sloped or railroad right-of-way. The property also is fairly isolated, without access to major roads; and the officials are of the opinion that the buildings will have to be razed due to asbestos concerns.

South Fayette Commissioners also took action in October to protect their own rights in the debate by rezoning the Mayview property. Previously zoned for rural residential use, it is now zoned for development as a business park, with offices and service-oriented shops. The township also is looking into creating a new zoning district for the property, possibly aimed at recreational use.

Ms. Snyder noted that she was not a real estate expert, but in her view “that’s a sweet piece of land that people will want to get their hands on.”

She envisions a commercial/retail mix, “kind of like a SouthSide Works thing” on the property, which fronts Chartiers Creek across from Upper St. Clair.

She said a $2 million ballpark figure mentioned by the state Department of General Services, which administers the site, was ridiculously low.

“That’s not in the ballpark,” she said. “That’s not even on Route 28 on the way to the ballpark.”

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