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“Panic Attacks & Panic Disorder”

Resource Link

This resource found on the HelpGuide.org website talks about panic attacks and panic Disorder in a very approachable easy to understand manner.  It offers some tips for dealing with Panic Attacks and also explains that there are medical conditions that could mimic a panic attack, and suggests what to do if you aren’t sure if you are having a panic attack or something else is wrong.

Panic attack

Panic attack (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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“On Anxiety, Control, and Video Games”

Article Link

This May 18, 2014 article on the Opening Turn website talks about some of the reasons that video games can offer someone with an anxiety disorder a bit of a refuge or place to escape their illness for a little while.

Being a gamer myself, and also someone who has an anxiety disorder among other diagnosis, I find that gaming offers me a break from facing a seemingly endless stream of unknown variables that seem to be ever changing in their dynamic.  Most games I play have a set of boundaries that are the same for every player, and each player can’t change the rules of the game on a whim, so for me I don’t feel like I’m dealing with curve-ball after curve-ball like I do in the real world.  I feel like I get a break from facing unknowns and get to exist for a little while in a realm where I know that if I do X then Y will always happen and that predictability is what lets me relax my mind and step away from all the anxiety I feel when I face the real world.  Not saying that I game 24/7 but for me it’s like a mini-vacation throughout my day … I’ll do some house work or attend a meeting and then spend a little time running around in a video game for a half hour or sometimes a couple hours depending on what else I need to accomplish, and then I’m off doing the next thing.  I love gaming, but I also recognize the need for a balance between my gaming and real world activities, but I find that for myself that as long as I keep up a good balance between the two, gaming can be very helpful in making my real world activities easier to carry out because I’ve gotten those breaks from my anxiety during the day.  I do feel that for me, the amount of time I spend gaming is something that helps me gauge how well I’m managing my illness.  I find that when I’m doing a good job at managing my illness, I tend to spend less time gaming, but if I slack off and get lazy about managing my illness, then my gaming tends to take over my entire life.  I’m not saying this is true for everyone, just that I’ve noticed in myself that if I pay attention to things like how much time I spend gaming I can have a pretty good idea whether I need to review how I’m managing my illness so I can function in the real world.  A vacation into a virtual world is a great thing, but living there is probably not the most brilliant idea in the world.  I do know I tend to spend more time gaming then most people I know, I would argue that I’m not everyone else.  When my illness is poorly managed I would easily find myself gaming from the time I woke up until the time I went to bed.  On the other hand when I’m managing my illness in a more balanced way, my gaming on average is about 2 to 3 hours a day depending on what else I have going on.

Future events marker for video games

Future events marker for video games (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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“Living with anxiety is hard, but there are coping mechanisms”

Article Link

This May 18, 2014 article on The Guardian website talks about what it is like to have an Anxiety Disorder and offers the hope to those with anxiety disorders that there is a possibility that they can begin to recover from their illness and lead a life similar to what someone without an anxiety disorder might experience.  It takes a lot of work and patience on the part of the person with the illness and having folks around them who are compassionate and understanding, to act as a support, is always helpful regardless of the type of mental illness a person may be experiencing

English: An anxious person

English: An anxious person (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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“What is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?”

Article Link

This January 12, 2012 Healthy Place blog post offers an introduction to what Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is and includes a little about what is seen in children, the public, and the military.

“Treatment Often Inadequate for Children With Anxiety Disorders, Study Finds”

Article Link

 

This January 29, 2014 Health Day article on the Philly.com website talks about findings that Anxiety in children is often under-treated.  It is felt that anxiety might be something that can predict future mental health issues that could carry on through adulthood.

 

One of several versions of the painting "...

One of several versions of the painting “The Scream”. The National Gallery, Oslo, Norway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

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“Take Mental Health Awareness Week Seriously”

English: An anxious person

English: An anxious person (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Article Link

 

This October 21, 2013 article on the “Onward State” website talks about one person’s experiences with having an anxiety disorder the writer’s experiences are some I was able to relate to myself, and I imagine many other like myself and the person who wrote the piece I linked to probably experience similar problems if they are dealing with a debilitating anxiety disorder.

 

 

 

For myself, I think one of the most frustrating things people have often said to me in a very sad attempt at trying to make me feel better is “everyone gets anxious” I do realize that folks who say this are likely saying it because they think it is helpful to the person with an anxiety disorder, but in reality, based on my experience, it is likely the least comforting response I’ve ever gotten when I disclose that I have an anxiety disorder.  People who don’t have their life put on hold or have it come to a screeching halt because of sheer panic that is often unable to be explained by the person having the panic attack, likely don’t have a clue what they are saying, and because everyone does get anxious about tests or running late for an appointment that kind of thing, everyone assumes that it is the same for folks like myself.  in reality it’s not the same and if it was the same, then everyone would be carrying a script for a medication to help them if the anxiety got too bad, or possibly even be utilizing things like a Service Dog to aid in managing anxiety and helping to alert them to an oncoming panic attack before it gets out of hand.  So while yes I do appreciate when people take an interest in trying to understand me or my diagnosis, I would be grateful if people would stop trying to compare everyday anxiety to what it is like for someone with an anxiety disorder it just isn’t helpful to anyone.

 

 

 

“June is National PTSD Awareness Month”

Regions of the brain affected by PTSD and stress.

Regions of the brain affected by PTSD and stress. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Article Link

This May 23, 2013 article on the PR newswire website talks about June being PTSD Awareness Month

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