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“The Medical Minute: The Causes and Signs of Depression in Children”

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This May 9, 2015 Gant Daily article talks about symptoms of depression and anxiety in kids and ways to respond to them and when to get professional help.

“Women and mental health: Warning signs and getting help”

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This April 24, 2015 article on the Philly.com website talks about the mental health needs of women and some of the things that may be impacting a woman’s mental health or even whether they seek help.

“Holidays not a good season for everyone”

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This December 14, 2014 Bucks County Courier Times article is a good reminder that there are people who struggle immensely not just during the holiday seasons, but other times of the year as well.  The article includes a video of an interview with someone who answers a hotline number and shares her perspective on what happens that causes the spikes in calls to hotlines across the country.

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Bucks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Bucks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“How to Cope with Being Anxious and Alone for the Holidays”

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This November 26, 2014 Healthy Place blog post talks about some ways to cope with Depression and Anxiety during the Holiday Season.

English: An anxious person

English: An anxious person (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Panic Attacks & Panic Disorder”

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This resource found on the HelpGuide.org website talks about panic attacks and panic Disorder in a very approachable easy to understand manner.  It offers some tips for dealing with Panic Attacks and also explains that there are medical conditions that could mimic a panic attack, and suggests what to do if you aren’t sure if you are having a panic attack or something else is wrong.

Panic attack

Panic attack (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Therapy in your own hands: The health benefits of knitting”

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This October 16, 2014 article on the Pocono Record website talks about the mental and physical benefits of knitting, and offers some possible reason for why interest in it has increased dramatically over the past several years.

“Good neighbors are good for your heart People who reported feeling more ‘social cohesion’ were less at risk for heart attacks”

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This August 22, 2014  WFMZ News segment actually has a bunch of smaller segments within it.  Some of the topics covered include ….

Information about how having a good neighbor can decrease your risk of a heart attack.

A segment offering insight into lesser known mental health risks due to giving birth, which can include PTSD and anxiety among other things that people typically don’t think of happening as the result of giving birth.

Cancer Screening shortfalls

and a segment on a study done involving 5th graders, violent video games and results that show a possible link between the kids who played for more than 2 hours per day and an increased risk of depression.  The researchers are saying further research is needed to better determine if the depression is caused by the gaming or if the gaming more than 2 hours per day could be in response to the depression and be viewed as a possible symptom of the depression.  The researches did say they really need to do more research to better understand the possible link between violent video games and depression so they can better understand the cause and effect between gaming and depression.

“The Best Reporting on Children With Post-Traumatic Stress”

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This June 24, 2014 NBC10.com article offers a collection of articles from across the country discussing the issue of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in civilian children and teens here in the United States

Regions of the brain affected by PTSD and stress.

Regions of the brain affected by PTSD and stress. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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“On Anxiety, Control, and Video Games”

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This May 18, 2014 article on the Opening Turn website talks about some of the reasons that video games can offer someone with an anxiety disorder a bit of a refuge or place to escape their illness for a little while.

Being a gamer myself, and also someone who has an anxiety disorder among other diagnosis, I find that gaming offers me a break from facing a seemingly endless stream of unknown variables that seem to be ever changing in their dynamic.  Most games I play have a set of boundaries that are the same for every player, and each player can’t change the rules of the game on a whim, so for me I don’t feel like I’m dealing with curve-ball after curve-ball like I do in the real world.  I feel like I get a break from facing unknowns and get to exist for a little while in a realm where I know that if I do X then Y will always happen and that predictability is what lets me relax my mind and step away from all the anxiety I feel when I face the real world.  Not saying that I game 24/7 but for me it’s like a mini-vacation throughout my day … I’ll do some house work or attend a meeting and then spend a little time running around in a video game for a half hour or sometimes a couple hours depending on what else I need to accomplish, and then I’m off doing the next thing.  I love gaming, but I also recognize the need for a balance between my gaming and real world activities, but I find that for myself that as long as I keep up a good balance between the two, gaming can be very helpful in making my real world activities easier to carry out because I’ve gotten those breaks from my anxiety during the day.  I do feel that for me, the amount of time I spend gaming is something that helps me gauge how well I’m managing my illness.  I find that when I’m doing a good job at managing my illness, I tend to spend less time gaming, but if I slack off and get lazy about managing my illness, then my gaming tends to take over my entire life.  I’m not saying this is true for everyone, just that I’ve noticed in myself that if I pay attention to things like how much time I spend gaming I can have a pretty good idea whether I need to review how I’m managing my illness so I can function in the real world.  A vacation into a virtual world is a great thing, but living there is probably not the most brilliant idea in the world.  I do know I tend to spend more time gaming then most people I know, I would argue that I’m not everyone else.  When my illness is poorly managed I would easily find myself gaming from the time I woke up until the time I went to bed.  On the other hand when I’m managing my illness in a more balanced way, my gaming on average is about 2 to 3 hours a day depending on what else I have going on.

Future events marker for video games

Future events marker for video games (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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“Living with anxiety is hard, but there are coping mechanisms”

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This May 18, 2014 article on The Guardian website talks about what it is like to have an Anxiety Disorder and offers the hope to those with anxiety disorders that there is a possibility that they can begin to recover from their illness and lead a life similar to what someone without an anxiety disorder might experience.  It takes a lot of work and patience on the part of the person with the illness and having folks around them who are compassionate and understanding, to act as a support, is always helpful regardless of the type of mental illness a person may be experiencing

English: An anxious person

English: An anxious person (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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