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“State to be paid $505,505 for Mayview”

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10154/1062611-57.stm

In the June 3, 2010 edition of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette is an article indicating that the property and building formerly the location of Mayview State Hospital is being purchased for $505,505.

While the amount is disappointing, there has been legislation signed that will indicates that the amount left after the State recovers it’s costs for maintaining the property since the closure, that the remaining amount will be split 50/50 betwenn the Mental Health and Mental Retardation budgets for the ares that were serviced by Mayview. 

The article describes things in more detail, but that should give you an idea of what is happening.

I’m pleased about where the proceeds will be going, but feel like the devaluing due to asbestos in the buildings, in many ways short changed the programs that would be benefiting from the money.  Still though I don’t feel it is a complete loss, things could have gone much differently then they did and something is generally better then nothing when it comes to money in my mind.

“Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unknown”

 

Those curious about the eventual fate of the Mayview State Hospital property will
have to wait another month.
The state task force studying the issue cancelled the meeting it had scheduled for
tonight, and is withholding its draft report to await more information.
“We are expecting the final appraisal and land survey in
June,” State Sen. John Pippy, R-Moon, said Monday.
“Originally we didn’t know when that was going to come
back. Since we’re going to have it, it seemed wise to wait
for it.”
The state, as part of its program to decentralize mental health
care, closed the hospital at the end of the year. Mr. Pippy is
co-chair of the task force, which is exploring the best use of the 335-acre site on
Chartiers Creek in South Fayette.
The process has not been free of controversy. Advocates have staged rallies at task
force meetings, calling for a sale at the highest possible price with the proceeds
going toward mental health care.
Others have been sounding a cautionary note, pointing out that slopes and wetlands
limit the buildable space to about 80 acres, noting that access on Mayview Road
would limit development for major business or commercial use and saying that the
roughly 30 buildings will have serious asbestos issues in demolition or reuse.
South Fayette commissioners recently changed the property’s zoning to a newly
created designation for recreational use, which would include use as a public park,
low-density residential or agriculatural use or such commercial recreation use as a
golf course.
The township is interested in acquiring the upper part of the property — west of
Mayview Road, up a steep slope — and adding it to the adjacent Fairview Park.
Some of the hospital buildings are more than a century old, and many are in poor
condition, ill-suited for reuse. Those dating from the middle of the 20th Century are
laden with asbestos, as are most buildings from the era. It will have to be safely
removed whether they are renovated or demolished.
Mr. Pippy said the task force essentially agrees with the goals of the mental health
advocates.
Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unknown
State to release report next month
Thursday, May 07, 2009
By Brian David, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
LOCAL / NEIGHBORHOODS / SOUTH
Inside Neighborhoods:
City
East
West
North
South
Washington
Westmoreland
5/10/2009 Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unk…
post-gazette.net/pg/…/968062-55.stm 1/2
advocates.
“We’ve been working with them closely over the last couple of months,” he said.
“We want to make sure that as much money comes from this as possible, and that it
goes to mental health care.”
But it’s not likely to be tens of millions, as advocates would like. “I don’t think
people have taken fully into account the cost of demolition,” Mr. Pippy said.
The task force commissioned the appraisal in March; the contract called for an
assessment of the land’s value at its highest possible use, regardless of zoning.
Having it should lend some clarity to the draft report, which Mr. Pippy described
as “essentially an attempt to summarize most of the notes we’ve taken at the various
hearings” held about the land’s use.
The task force announced several weeks ago that it would post the report on its
Web site about a week prior to tonight’s meeting. But when it cancelled the
meeting, it also cancelled plans to post the report.
“There won’t be anything in there that’s new,” Mr. Pippy said. “It’s all the stuff
people have been hearing talk about. But it seemed prudent to wait for the
appraisal.”

 

This article first seen in the May 7, 2009 issue of the Pittsburgh post-gazette offers an update as to where things are with regards to the issues surrounding the re-use of the former Mayview state Hospital property.  The article can be found in it’s original format at … http://www.post-gazette.net/pg/09127/968062-55.stm

Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unknown

State to release report next month

Those curious about the eventual fate of the Mayview State Hospital property will have to wait another month.

The state task force studying the issue cancelled the meeting it had scheduled for tonight, and is withholding its draft report to await more information.

“We are expecting the final appraisal and land survey in June,” State Sen. John Pippy, R-Moon, said Monday.

“Originally we didn’t know when that was going to come back. Since we’re going to have it, it seemed wise to wait for it.”

The state, as part of its program to decentralize mental health care, closed the hospital at the end of the year. Mr. Pippy is co-chair of the task force, which is exploring the best use of the 335-acre site on Chartiers Creek in South Fayette.

The process has not been free of controversy. Advocates have staged rallies at task force meetings, calling for a sale at the highest possible price with the proceeds going toward mental health care.

Others have been sounding a cautionary note, pointing out that slopes and wetlands limit the buildable space to about 80 acres, noting that access on Mayview Road would limit development for major business or commercial use and saying that the roughly 30 buildings will have serious asbestos issues in demolition or reuse.

South Fayette commissioners recently changed the property’s zoning to a newly created designation for recreational use, which would include use as a public park, low-density residential or agriculatural use or such commercial recreation use as a golf course.

The township is interested in acquiring the upper part of the property — west of Mayview Road, up a steep slope — and adding it to the adjacent Fairview Park.

Some of the hospital buildings are more than a century old, and many are in poor condition, ill-suited for reuse. Those dating from the middle of the 20th Century are laden with asbestos, as are most buildings from the era. It will have to be safely removed whether they are renovated or demolished.

Mr. Pippy said the task force essentially agrees with the goals of the mental health advocates.

Mayview State Hospital’s fate still unknown State to release report next month.  Advocates. “We’ve been working with them closely over the last couple of months,” he said.

“We want to make sure that as much money comes from this as possible, and that it goes to mental health care.”

But it’s not likely to be tens of millions, as advocates would like. “I don’t think people have taken fully into account the cost of demolition,” Mr. Pippy said.

The task force commissioned the appraisal in March; the contract called for an assessment of the land’s value at its highest possible use, regardless of zoning.

Having it should lend some clarity to the draft report, which Mr. Pippy described as “essentially an attempt to summarize most of the notes we’ve taken at the various hearings” held about the land’s use.

The task force announced several weeks ago that it would post the report on its Web site about a week prior to tonight’s meeting. But when it cancelled the meeting, it also cancelled plans to post the report.

“There won’t be anything in there that’s new,” Mr. Pippy said. “It’s all the stuff people have been hearing talk about. But it seemed prudent to wait for the appraisal.”

“South Fayette plans public hearing for Mayview property”

This article found in the March 17, 2009 issue of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette further discusses  the possible uses for the former Mayview State Hospital Grounds.  The article can be found in its original format at … http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09076/956220-100.stm

South Fayette plans public hearing for Mayview property
Tuesday, March 17, 2009

The South Fayette commissioners last night set an April 13 public hearing date for a proposed new recreational-use zoning district that was designed with the Mayview State Hospital property in mind.

Mayview closed at the end of 2008 and the state has launched a task force to determine the best use for the 330-acre property. An appraisal has been ordered to determine the value of the property and its most profitable potential use.

South Fayette officials have said that only about 90 of the property’s acres are useable because of wetlands, slopes and railroad tracks. It is also in a relatively remote location along Mayview Road fronting Chartiers Creek.

The property originally was zoned for residential use, but the commissioners in October rezoned it for use as a business park. They said at the time that they were designing a new zoning designation for it.

South Fayette manager Mike Hoy said the proposed district is modeled on recreational zones in other municipalities, allowing private, public or non-profit recreational uses, agriculture or extremely low-density housing.

He said officials had consulted with their counterparts in neighboring municipalities — especially Upper St. Clair, which lies on the other side of the creek — in drawing the district.

“We want to provide the best possibility for redevelopment in a manner that is in the best interests of not only South Fayette but others, too,” Mr. Hoy said. “What can we do here that can benefit everyone?”

Advocates for former Mayview patients have been lobbying to have the land sold for the highest amount possible with the money going to help care for the mentally ill.

Mr. Hoy said the zoning should add value, because the slopes and wetlands can be used for recreation.

“It really lends value to areas that are pretty much undevelopable in the first place,” he said.

Brian David can be reached at bdavid@post-gazette.com or at 412-722-0086.
First published on March 17, 2009 at 5:36 am

“Mayview property likely will be split”

This article found on PittsburghLive.com at the following address … http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/s_612789.html Further discusses the potential use of the former Mayview State Hospital property

Mayview property likely will be split

By Bonnie Pfister
TRIBUNE-REVIEW

Saturday, February 21, 2009

 

The 300-acre campus of the former Mayview State Hospital likely will be split in two, with its tree-covered slopes preserved as green space, while the flatter area could be redeveloped into a residential “village” or business park.

South Fayette Township Manager Michael Hoy said Friday that removing 40 steeply sloped acres would likely make the grounds more attractive to developers. Proposals for the land that housed the psychiatric hospital are still in their infancy.

The property is zoned for either business or residential development.

Building a housing and treatment facility for people with mental-health issues also is a possibility, Hoy said.

Chris Goswick of the Allegheny County Department of Economic Development, and a member of the Mayview Land Reuse Task Force that met Thursday to discuss the future of the property, said the county can’t afford large-scale infrastructure work there. The land is accessible by a simple two-lane road only, and county resources already are tapped to cover upgrades to existing bridges and roads.

Mayview ceased to operate as a hospital in late December, although 11 patients are housed in what is now a long-term structured residence — the most secure type of housing-and-treatment facility available for people with mental illnesses. Those patients are expected to be moved to other accommodations by the end of June, said Rich Kuppelweiser, the facility’s chief operating officer.

On Thursday, about 60 activists with the Consumer Health Coalition urged task force co-Chairs Sen. John Pippy, R-Moon, and Nick Kotik, D-McKees Rocks, to find a way to bring proceeds of the land sale to the region for mental-health services. Sen. Jim Ferlo, D-Highland Park, introduced such a resolution Wednesday to the Legislature. Existing law requires proceeds of state land to go to a general fund.

Kotik offered his support, but made no promises.

“John and I will do all we can,” Kotik said. “But unless we can convince at least 26 senators and 102 legislators that this has merit, it’s not going to pass.”

Members of the task force will meet at least twice more before making final recommendations to the state, perhaps in May. The land sale is not expected for at least another year.

“Task force nears end of Mayview study”

The following article was found in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review on Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2009 at the following address … http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/s_612203.html

 

Task force nears end of Mayview study

By The Tribune-Review

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

 

A task force studying how to re-use Mayview State Hospital property is scheduled to meet at 7 p.m. Thursday in the dietary building of the Mayview campus in South Fayette.

The task force, chaired by state Sen. John Pippy, R-Moon, and state Rep. Nick Kotik, D-Coraopolis, is wrapping up a year of study on possible uses of 30 buildings on the 335-acre campus near Boyce Road.

The mental health facility was officially closed in late December as part of a statewide move to treat patients in community-based settings. About a dozen patients are awaiting placement to other long-term facilities.

“Mayview Has Deep Roots In Pittsburgh Area”

 This article found on KDKA’s website dated December 29, 2008 can be viewed in it’s original format at …. http://kdka.com/local/Mayview.state.hospital.2.896738.html  It offers a little more information about the history of Mayview State Hospital.  It has some info that is similar to other articles I’ve posted about Mayview’s history, but there were also some items that weren’t in other articles, so it’s worth reading if you have an interest in the history of Mayview State Hospital.  KDKA also has a video that goes along with this article it can be seen by clicking the following link …. http://video.aol.com/video-detail/mayview-state-hospital-closes-for-good/1149901200 

Mayview Has Deep Roots In Pittsburgh Area

SOUTH FAYETTE TWP. (KDKA) ―

The roots of Mayview State Hospital run deep. It began as a “poor house,” located on Virgin Alley, now Oliver Avenue, near Wood Street in the early 1800’s.

This news item from the “Pittsburgh Dispatch” of 1893: “The removal of inmates of the City Poor Farm occurred yesterday. In less than 8 hours after the work commenced, the city’s poor were in their new quarters.”

With mental illness still very much a mystery, they did the best they could in those new quarters known as Marshalsea back then.  More than 300 acres of farmland in South Fayette Township eventually became Mayview State Hospital. But the mentally ill were only part of the patient population.

“It was sort of the misfits of society would be sent to these places,” says Father George DeVille, now pastor of Holy Rosary Parish in Washington County. Father DeVille was chaplain at Mayview and has written a history of the place.

In the 1930’s there were 4,000 patients and a train ran from Mayview to downtown Pittsburgh. Aside from sheltering the mentally ill, Mayview housed a nursery for illegitimate children, provided medical and surgical treatments for the poor and elderly, as well as tuberculosis and syphilis patients.

Those with mental illness received hydro and steam box therapies, insulin and electro shock therapies. The pharmacy had a liquor license.

Even in later years, the average stay for patients with mental issues was 10 to 12 years. For some it was the only home they knew. “We would have patients 40 to 60 years,” DeVille said.

The real change in therapy came in the 1950’s with the development of specialized medications and it is those drugs that have allowed those with mental illness to move back to the community in the least restrictive settings – no longer isolated or behind bars.

“We did what we did with what we had at the time – and now things are improving – I really do think it’s better for the patient,” DeVille said.

Twelve patients still remain at Mayview. They will be cared for at the old facility by UPMC Mercy’s Behavioral Care Unit until an appropriate place can be found for them. The property is being appraised by the state and a task force will ultimately determine what will be done with it.

“Next hearing to involve residents’ comments”

The debate continues over whether or not Rolling Hills can be utilized as a long-term mental health facility.  With the closure of Mayview days away, the debate continues, which means that 15 patients currently at Mayview along with staff will be housed temoporarily on mayview grounds until other arrangements can be made for them.  I found this article in the December 25, 2008 posting at “YourSouthhills.com” a link to the original article can be found at the end of the article.

Next hearing to involve residents’ comments

Created Dec 25 2008 – 3:06am

Baldwin Township residents will have their turn to speak regarding plans for a proposed mental health facility to enter their neighborhood at a meeting next month.

At the second of three public hearings, which was held last week, Mercy Behavioral Health officials finished their line of questioning for several witnesses regarding a conditional use application to place a mental health facility into the former Rolling Hills Manor site along Newport Drive.

The facility would include a long-term structured residence and an extended acute care program.

Now that Mercy officials have finished presenting their case, it is time for those opposed to the facility to offer their testimony, township solicitor Thomas McDermott said.

A date has not been set for the third and final public hearing on the proposed facility, but must be scheduled within 45 days of the Dec. 18 meeting. Township commissioners will set the hearing date and time at their next board meeting.

Township commissioners will then have an additional 45 days to render a decision on the conditional use application.

Mercy’s final push last week included testimony from Mary Jeanne Serafin, chief executive officer of Mayview State Hospital, and Larry Bodnar, real estate appraiser.

In front of about 100 residents at the Castle Shannon Fire Hall, Serafin explained to the commissioners the similarities and differences of a long-term structured residence from a state hospital and why there is a need for such a facility.

Mayview State Hospital, she said, is set to close on Monday. Some of the patients and staff from the hospital will move to the Baldwin Township facility, if permission for its opening is granted.

Until then, she said after the meeting, the patients and staff who were scheduled to move to the facility will stay on the grounds of Mayview in a temporary long-term structured residence.

Serafin also explained the differences between regulations for what is required in a long-term structured residence and a nursing home, which is type of facility that Mercy officials placed on the application.

“There are similarities,” she said. “A doctor is a doctor. A doctor in psychiatry has a different specialty than an orthopedic, nevertheless, they’re the same doctor.”

It is the same for a long-term structured residence and a nursing home, she said.

But she agreed with McDermott’s questioning that both facilities are regulated under two, separate guidelines.

“However, when you look at the content of the regulations (there are) many similarities,” she said.

But McDermott questioned if there would be similarities in regulations for all types of facilities, because it is human nature to need certain items like food and shelter.

Bodnar’s testimony addressed some concerns that residents had previously raised that with the new facility, the values of their homes would decline.

“It is my opinion that the proposed location of Mercy Behavioral Health will have no negative effect on single-family dwellings,” he said.

The appraiser, hired by Mercy, showed figures from three facilities that he said had a “stigma” or a “fear of the unknown” regarding a “similar” facility entering into a neighborhood.

Bodnar said the neighborhoods of the facilities that he looked at showed only positive increases in real estate sales following a mental health facility moving into the communities.

But John Arminas, a lawyer hired by several township residents, questioned how the facilities Bodnar compared were similar, when one of them was a “small, residential” house, compared to a facility for 32 people.

Bodnar said he had a reason for choose the sites to compare to the Baldwin Township facility.

“I had certain data that I could work with and this is what I could work with,” he said.

his real estate study.

Bodnar also struggled to answer other questions about the proposed Mercy site or the other sites he compared it to — answering, “I don’t know,” to several questions posed by Arminas and McDermott.


“Mayview to close soon; 15 patients will stay on”

This article found in the December 21, 2008 edition of the Pittsburgh Tribune Review originally seen at the following address …. http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/cityregion/s_603873.html  discusses what are the last days of Mayview State Hospital before it closes.  Apparently there is a glitch of sorts involving 15 patients at Mayview who were suppose to be placed in the proposed facility at the former Rolling Hills nursing home.  had Rolling Hills been allowed to open as a mental health treatment facility there wouldn’t be 15 people in limbo.  It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

Mayview to close soon; 15 patients will stay on

By Bonnie Pfister
TRIBUNE-REVIEW

Sunday, December 21, 2008

 

Mayview State Hospital officially closes at the end of the month, but about 15 patients will continue to live there and be treated through the spring, as county officials try to find supervised community settings for them.

The state Department of Public Welfare announced in August 2007 that it would close the South Fayette mental hospital, part of de-institutionalization that began in the 1970s and has accelerated in recent years because of legal rulings won by patient advocates. With proper treatment, supervision and support, experts say, people with mental illnesses are able and deserve to live in community settings.

“Recovery can and does happen for people living with a mental illness,” said Public Welfare spokeswoman Stacey Witalec. “As we moved through the closure, residents were only moved into the community when the appropriate level of services and supports were available to aid in their success.”

More than 200 patients have been discharged into such settings as group homes and apartments with on-site 24-hour support, officials said. The dozen or so patients still at Mayview were slated to move into the former Rolling Hills nursing home in Baldwin Township.

But the fate of that facility remains uncertain. Mercy Behavioral Health wants to turn the now-vacant building into a long-term structured residence, the most secure setting outside of a state hospital, with round-the-clock, on-site staffing that could house up to 16 people, typically for stays of about two years. Adjacent would be an extended acute-care facility, also with 16 beds, a hospital alternative where patients may stay for as long as six months.

About 100 neighbors turned out for the second of three public hearings Thursday, raising concerns about property values and safety. John Paravati, 44, a civil engineer and longtime township resident, said he was concerned about having such a facility so close to houses and school bus stops. The buffered rural setting of Mayview or a commercial zone would be a more appropriate setting, he said.

“This doesn’t belong in a residential area,” Paravati said.

Many residents’ concerns stem from cases in which people with untreated mental illnesses harm others around them. In May, Lisa Maas, 18, was fatally stabbed in her Shadyside apartment. Police charged a neighbor, Terrence Andrews, 38, who told police he had been in and out of Western Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute and Clinic dozens of times during the past decade.

In August 2007, Troy Hill Jr. of Penn Hills was charged with stabbing his 11-year-old twin brothers, killing one and severely injuring the other. Both Andrews and Hill are receiving treatment and awaiting prosecution at Torrance State Hospital in Derry Township, where all 47 of Mayview’s mentally ill patients facing criminal charges were moved last month.

“There are too many incidents where patients from the mental health field are either hurting themselves or seriously harming other people,” said Neil Rosen, an attorney representing both the Hill and Maas families in possible civil lawsuits. “We need to spend a lot more money and a lot more time in this area.”

But cases like those of Hill and Andrews — while harrowing — are rare, numerous mental health experts say. Mary Fleming, CEO of Allegheny Health Choices, a nonprofit that is coordinating planning around Mayview’s closing, said people with mental illnesses are far more likely to be victims of crime and abuse than perpetrators.

“That is particularly true of people coming out of a state hospital who have really been institutionalized,” she said. “They are not very well-adapted to the real world. We hear lots of stories of (former patients) being panhandled very regularly. They just do what people tell them to do, because that’s kind of what they did in the hospital.

“That transition needs to be very slow and very careful,” she added.

Fleming said many communities have responded positively once they understand how much support follows patients coming directly from Mayview.

“In addition to living in a facility that has 24-hour staff, almost all patients are on these multidisciplinary community treatment teams. They’re seen six or seven times a week, sometimes twice a day. There’s a lot of support, a lot of tracking and monitoring.

“It’s not been that difficult,” Fleming said. “The Baldwin situation would be the exception.”

“Helping the mentally ill”

 This is an older article from the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review dated Tuesday, July 3, 2007, it discusses a misconception the paper left readers with about folks who are mentally ill, but attempted to correct with this article.  The article can be viewed in its original format at … http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/s_515505.html 

Helping the mentally ill
Tuesday, July 3, 2007

While it is important to highlight the need for additional resources for individuals with mental illness living in the community, the Trib’s article “Mayview reductions put strain on resources” (June 25 and PghTrib.com) left the false impression that we shouldn’t discharge mentally ill people from institutions because they will become criminals. All individuals have the right to live in the community, regardless of their disability — and they do not commit crimes at a higher rate than the general population. The programs to discharge individuals from the state mental hospitals and close beds are well thought out and involve comprehensive planning. People who do not need to be in hospitals must not be kept there.

It is equally critical that the mental health system in the community be adequately funded. We must continue to develop innovative, quality services that follow best-practice models for individuals with mental illness. We need to retain and sufficiently pay qualified staff so that we do not lose some of the best and the brightest professionals.

The criminal justice system cannot be the new shackles of the future for individuals with mental illness. The answer is not to stop de-institutionalization, as the Trib’s article implied, but rather to maintain and develop adequate resources for people with mental illness.

All people deserve the opportunity to live a quality life and to be treated with dignity and respect.

Laurie Barnett Levine
Monroeville
The writer is executive director of the Mental Health Association in Westmoreland County.

Mayview State Hospital Task Force

Here’s a link to a new site which is going to include updates on the land use from Mayview’s closure and other related issues.  Definitely worth taking a peek if you want to know what is being said in some of the public meetings.

http://www.mayviewlandreusetaskforce.com/

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